Coverage

  • For as long as there have been retail, there have been shoplifters. As technology advances, so do ways to stop and deter shoplifting (and profit loss). In the tech-savvy Bay Area of California, a company called 3VR has been marketing facial recognition as a way to both stop would-be thieves and to increase in-store security. In-store cameras can both recognize shoplifters - and gage a shopper’s mood by intelligently reading facial cues.

  • By Gasia Mikaelian

    OAKLAND, Calif. — A number of Bay Area stores are using surveillance cameras that are so high tech, they can track some surprisingly personal information without shoppers ever knowing it.

    The stores using the cameras insist they use the information to provide benefits to customers, but some argue those benefits come at too high a cost.

  • We often talk with credit unions and banks—big and small—about how they need to both invest in technology and develop a culture of people productivity in their branches. In response, we sometimes hear, "OK, we get it," but then nothing changes. These institutions develop a strong branch concept, train the staff and hire the right manager, but performance is still lackluster. When this occurs, the issue is how staff are being monitored and coached.
  • LAS VEGAS—ISC West 2014, here April 2-4, drew a crowd of 26,000, and was second largest show in its history.

    Common themes Security Director News came across were the increased willingness of manufacturers to listen to end users about what they needed and to respond with a customized approach that could then be turned around and adapted easily for users even in other verticals and the positive impact of business intelligence systems for security directors.

  • When nurses head home after a grueling 12-hour shift, the last thing Carolinas HealthCare System (CHS) wants them to worry about is getting to their cars safely. The same holds true for patients and visitors coming in and out of the busy Morehead Medical Plaza (MMP) parking deck in Charlotte, N.C. Hospital visits are often stressful, and CHS has made it their mission to increase comfort and security from beginning to end.

  • The rapid pace of development in video surveillance technology has equated to an equal rise in development for Video Management Systems (VMS). As a security dealer or integrator, staying on top of these software advances and the trends affecting them can sometimes be a challenge.

    SD&I sat down with representatives from six VMS vendors in this exclusive technology roundtable to get the lowdown on the latest VMS advancements, the impact of standardization, strategies for deployment and RMR generation.

  • 3VR CEO Al Shipp talks to Stuart Varney about how retail analytics can help brick-and-mortar stores improve the shopping experience.

  • Retailers have long tracked activity in stores, with video cameras. Now, they have an option to track you. Security tech company 3VR has unveiled an in-store video camera that allegedly uses facial recognition to gauge your age, gender and mood.

    Retailers could use real-time information to customize digital signs - just as you are passing.

  • As retailers battle to make their brick-and-mortar stores more productive in the age of e-commerce, 3VR is among companies looking to help them through what’s been dubbed "big data video-mining."

    3VR, at this week’s National Retail Federation expo in Manhattan, showed off video cameras that can, with great accuracy, peg the age, gender, and mood of passersby in real-time, displayed in labels underneath one’s image.

  • But technology has moved up a notch to search out faces. No longer is it necessary to watch hours of surveillance video for a suspect or car. A computer program developed by the San Francisco company 3VR can quickly search huge quantities of video to find a specific face — matching gender, age and facial characteristics. It also can detect suspicious behavior — such as lingering — that the human eye might not notice.

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