Coverage

  • It's no secret the Central Intelligence Agency has an investment firm that funds startups that could have a big impact for the Agency. If there is a company out there doing intelligence research, it's likely that In-Q-Tel, the CIA's personal investor, either looked them up or made a check out to them.

  • The U.S. Commerce Department reported total retail sales in 2011 were $4.7 trillion, an 8 percent increase over 2010 total retail sales. The retail industry’s sheer size presents a big target for internal and external criminal activity, creating a major issue for retailers — to the tune of $119 billion in shrinkage in 2011, up 6.6 percent since 2010.

  • There has been much discussion about the use of the Internet, social media and other technologies by criminals to organize multi-state or multi-national organized crime rings. However, forward-thinking security, loss prevention and law enforcement professionals are identifying ways to use the same technologies to cooperate across state lines and share critical information that will both solve and reduce crime.

  • ANCHORAGE, Alaska – When a credit union deploys a new technology solution, two things are almost sure to happen: It will take longer than expected to optimally use the system, and there will be some software glitches. Both things proved true for Denali Alaskan FCU. It implemented a 3VR surveillance system as it sought to swap out its old Lenox surveillance cameras “for something that would give more bang for the buck,” said Kirby Milham, security director for Denali, who oversees security for 18 branches in six Alaska cities and all its ATMs.

  • LAS VEGAS – Several prisons in the Mexican state of Guanajuato are using facial recognition software from 3VR to manage visitors and keep tabs on suspects who act as intermediaries between gang members behind bars. At the largest prison in Guanajuato, in the city of Leon, which is just north of Mexico City, there are sometimes 1,500 visitors a day, Pablo Antonio Sanchez Urbina, Guanajuato's undersecretary of public security, told Security Director News at last week's ISC West.

  • LAS VEGAS – Americans have high expectations for video surveillance and expect private businesses to use video to help law enforcement solve criminal cases, according to a new poll released today by 3VR, the video intelligence company. Conducted by JZ Analytics, the interactive poll of 850 adults has a margin of error of +/- 3.5%.

  • It’s easy to track shoppers’ behavior on the Web, thanks to tools like Google Analytics, but brick-and-mortar stores have few resources available to help them analyze customers’ actions. England’s Path Intelligence sells a product that allows retailers to track customers’ paths through a store using their cell phone signals. The service, used primarily in Europe, can also help store owners determine their visitors’ nationality by identifying their phone numbers’ country codes.

  • Technological advances are accelerating by exponential leaps and bounds. So much so that futurists like author Ray Kurzweil speculate about the imminent dawn of the Singularity — when artificial intelligence will allow humankind to transcend our biological limitations and amplify our creativity. It's hard to imagine what security might be like when that day arrives — but whatever it is will have evolved from some of the creations included in Security Sales & Integration's 2011 Top 30 Technology Innovations.

  • Retailers have a case of Web envy. Brick-and-mortar stores have long wanted to track consumers the way online merchants do and are starting to figure out how. They're using security cameras to monitor shopping behavior and tracking mobile phones to divine which stores people visit.

  • Retailers have a case of Web envy. Brick-and-mortar stores have long wanted to track consumers the way online merchants do and are starting to figure out how. They’re using security cameras to monitor shopping behavior and tracking mobile phones to divine which stores people visit.

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